A Family Medicine Career

On average, a family medical physician sees ten to twenty patients per day, and spends approximately fifteen minutes of his or her workday with each patient. A family medical doctor is a primary care physician who treats men and women of all ages. More often than not, he or she treats each individual member of an entire family. Delivering comprehensive health care, the family medical physician is also responsible for prescribing and managing preventive medications for his or her patients.

In the United States, a family practitioner holds either an M.D. or a D.O. degree. He or she must complete a three-year family medicine residency, after medical school, before working as a primary care physician. Family practice can have many attractive qualities that may lead a physician to research the topic further. Family medicine physicians enjoy the luxury of pre-set, standing office hours. As physicians in other fields of medicine will attest, a set daily schedule is a rarity. While the family physician could potentially work long hours, weekends, and holidays, this is very rarely the case for family practice physicians.

Training

A family practice physician is required to complete undergraduate school, followed by medical school, and then a three-year family medicine residency. During residency, a physician will explore the many different aspects of family medicine. A family medical doctor is required, during residency, to rotate through the individual branches of family practice, including but not limited to: geriatrics, gynecology, internal medicine and pediatrics.

A family medical physician treats everyone, no matter his or her race, age, gender, or condition. Usually a specialist has focus in a certain field of practice. The family physician is a database of general, medical knowledge that allows him or her to treat the whole patient, as well as the whole family. Often working as a solo practitioner of his or her practice, a family practice physician may also choose to work as a part of an ensemble of practitioners, all within with the same facility. Most doctors spilt their daily efforts between their private practices and the community hospital.

For all intents and purposes, it has been confirmed by surveys that the family practitioner is most likely to profess that he, or she, is content in both their professional and their personal lives. The family medical doctor often enjoys the freedom of not having to commit to or depend on a community hospital to properly treat their patients. In addition, the schedule flexibility and freedom of time allows the family medical doctor to enjoy his her personal life without having to constantly be on call.

For it’s natural, family-based environment, a family practice is a great way to find balance between work and family. As mentioned previously, the hours can be great and the community involvement priceless. The on-going continued education that comes along with working daily with the people of your community can make for an enriching and fulfilling experience. As of 2007, the average salary of the family medicine career, in the United States, was $160,000 per year.

Discovering The Right Sports Medicine Career

Are you ready to jump into an exciting career filled with energized people? A career in medicine can put you into the action, even if you are on the sideline instead of actually in the middle of the game. Jobs in sport medicine are fast growing.

What is This Medical Career?

Before listing career opportunities it is important you have a good understanding exactly what sports medicine is. It is the study and practice of skills and techniques for the medical treatment and therapy for individuals who participate in athletics or physical activity. The definition is actually quite broad. Professional medical techniques are used for the treatment of injuries sustained through all types of physical activity which can include:

Sore Muscles from Weight Lifting

Broken Bones or Injured Joints from Contact Sports

Strained Backs from an Over Zealous Golf Swing

Minor Impact Injuries from Aerobics Classes

Torn Ligaments of a Professional Baseball Pitcher

Treatment of a Sprained Ankle

If you see a professional treating a sports or exercise related injury it can be considered under the umbrella of sports medicine.

The Variety of Careers in Athletic Medicine

As you may be guessing from the broad and somewhat vague definition of sports medicine the careers in this profession can cover a wide range of choices. Here are some of the more popular titles you may run across:

Sports Medicine Physician

Physical Therapist

Athletic Trainer

Massage Therapist

Chiropractors

Exercise Physiologists

Kinesiotherapists

Certified Personal Trainer

Certified Health Fitness Specialist

Sports Nutritionist

Along with this wide variety of titles comes a large disparity in wages, too. At the pinnacle of wages is the medical physician with trainers being towards the lower end of the spectrum. Here are some median salaries for a variety of jobs in this field:

Medical Physician – $240,648

Physical Therapist – $74,336

Athletic Trainer – $38,972

Massage Therapist – $42,737

Chiropractor – $129,420

Exercise Physiologist – $44,849

Certified Personal Trainer – $52,750

Sports Nutritionist – $52,867

As becomes very obvious from these salary figures, medicine has a highly variable range of salaries. Depending on your level of education, experience, and specialty you can expect to make anywhere from an average income to very high income levels.

The Educational Requirements of a Sports Medicine Career

Careers can have a wide variety of educational requirements depending on your specialty. Let us examine a few of the sports medicine jobs and their educational demands.

Medical Physician – This broad specialty of medicine will require the following educational requirements:

4 Year Bachelor of Science Degree in Pre-Med or Science

4 Years of Medical School

3-5 Years of Residency

Multiple years of fellowship depending on specialty.

Sports Physical Therapist – This specialized form of physical therapy is also highly demanding in educational requirements, but the rewards are high. Physical therapists usually have less stress and work less hours per week than the average physician. The education requirements include:

4 Year Bachelors Degree

3 Years Doctor of Physical Therapy education. (Note: Some programs allow a 3+3 program where one year of physical therapy education replaces a year of your Bachelor Degree requirements.)

Sports Massage Therapist -This is a loosely regulated position which is usually licensed on a state level. Two examples of requirements for a massage therapist are:

Florida – 500 Hours Training – Passing of licensing exam.

New York – 1000 Hours Training – Pass State Exam.

This is one of the easiest educational directions to start your career in medicine. Many of the job openings will be found in fitness centers and spas with pay being based upon a percentage of sales.

Certified Personal Sports Trainer – Educational requirements on this position vary greatly. You can find courses through universities, trade schools, and online educational classes. You should check your local state requirements. Often the most important requirement is your own extreme level of fitness, knowledge of exercise mechanics, and ability to motivate.

A sports medicine career does not always mean going to 4 years or more of school. As you can see in the examples of a massage therapist or trainer the requirements can be much lower. The difference will be in your earning potential and ability to specialize. Choosing to pursue a career in sports medicine offers not only great income opportunities, but unique opportunities to serve in a career you love.